Email: 
peter.hoffman@oregonstate.edu
Phone: 
541-737-1766
Education: 

BS Biology, Oregon State University, 1986
BS Microbiology, Oregon State University, 1986

Experience: 

Jun 2016 - Current, Assistant Director, Food Safety and Environmental Stewardship program, Director Dr. Kim A Anderson, Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University.
Jan 2014 - Jun 2016. Senior Faculty Research Assistant. Food Safety and Environmental Stewardship program, Director Dr. Kim A Anderson, Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University
UV-induced degradation of complex Polycylic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) mixtures under accurately emulated terrestrial conditions.

May 2013 – May 2014 (0.6FTE) Senior Faculty Research Assistant. Laboratory of Dr. Douglas Barofsky, Department of Chemistry/Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University
Responsible for defining the analytical capability of a novel radio frequency-free electromagnetostatic (EMS) cell devised for electron-capture dissociation (ECD) of ions in a electrospray ionization (ESI) hybrid quadrupole/time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometer.

October 2013 – December 2013 (0.4 FTE) Senior Faculty Research Assistant. Laboratory of Dr. Andrew Buermeyer, Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University.
Mismatch repair responses to poly-aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) treatment of human cell lines. Continuation of an ongoing project defining the spectrum of mutations generated in the human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene by exposure of mismatch-repair (MMR) proficient and deficient cell lines to PAH/DNA lesion inducing compounds.

1996 – May 2013 Senior Faculty Research Assistant
1990 – 1996 Faculty Research Assistant;
Laboratory of Dr. John Hays, Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University.
Responsible for the management of an active research lab at OSU with a primary focus on DNA repair and genomic stability in a variety of model systems including Arabidopsis thaliana, E. coli, yeast, and cultured human cells.